Concept: Maintenance Training 2030


April 25, 2032 …

Ed, a Canadian aircraft maintenance training instructor located in Montreal, gets ready for his upcoming engines maintenance class.

Supposed to be a big class this week, 8 students.

  • 1 from Canada
  • 1 from the US
  • 2 from South America
  • 2 from India, and
  • 2 from China

Ed checks on the equipment in the classroom.

He puts on his Holo-Glasses, which come to life, softly glowing holographic data displays and icons popping up in front of him.  The device recognizes him, launching the virtual assistant to greet him. “Hello Ed! How are you? All set for your class?” “Just fine, thanks. Everything set?” “Yes, Ed. All the students are going to be attending; no cancellations. Everything looks good with the students. One was having some technical issues earlier, but I helped him through it.” Excellent,” thought Ed. “Everything looks alright with 15 mins to go.”

Ed begins cueing up the opening presentation notes, and the multimedia training manual. These pop up in their own windows in Ed’s field of view.

As Ed continues his preparations, the digital assistant relays notifications confirming the status of the students. The assistant is communicating with the students before class so Ed can focus on his preparation. Everything is looking good. Ed checks the 3D cameras and tests out his holopresence projection, seeing what his students will see.

“Loo-king good! Let’s do this!”

A few minutes later, the class begins. Ed welcomes the students as they holopresence in from their remote locations. Ed and the students, their Holo-glasses on,  take their places in the shared virtual classroom. The software places softly glowing holographic representations of the other participants in the shared visual space.  Ed looks out at the students’ faces, and the students see a holographic overlay of the same classroom and the same students from their own virtual perspective. At first, the experience is a little eerie, but as the class gets going, and all the students introduce themselves, the illusion takes hold and it feels like everyone is in the same classroom.

Ed presents the content, asks questions, and listens to the responses. Master teacher he is, he observes carefully, gets a sense of the learners’ body language and expressions, and, much like in a real class, adjusts as he goes. Ed brings up holographic 3D animations and models of the engine and components for the class to see. He zooms, rotates, and takes apart the holographic engine parts. The hologram also appears in the students’ fields of view, and Ed invites students here and there to come up and try for themselves and demonstrate actions to the class. Static images appear on screens in mid air, demonstrating schematics.

In the afternoon portion it is time for the virtual hands-on lab exercises. Ed and the students convene again, once again with beautiful, interactive 3D holographic models of the engine floating in the shared digital overlay. This time however everyone puts on their SureTouch(TM) haptic feedback gloves.

The gloves use sensors to read finger and hand position, the headset measures their hand positions in relation to the digital model’s virtual position, and actuators in the gloves give pressure feedback to simulate handling real objects with substance instead of just weightless holograms. It’s kind of weird at first, and it’s not quite the same as the real thing, but close enough for horseshoes and hand grenades, as they say. And definitely a hell of a lot cheaper than taking an actual engine offline to train.

As always, it took a few years for the technology to perfect itself and a lot of research and proofs of concept before the regulators really believed it could be as effective as the real thing. The Dutch Aerospace Lab did some great research as always, and once EASA signed off, the other regulators followed pretty swiftly after. Regulators came to appreciate virtual maintenance training, just as they came to appreciate the power of full flight simulators decades before.

The company definitely appreciates it too – they save a small fortune in flights, hotels, taxis, and per diems doing virtual classes like this over the course of the year. As do the students’ companies..

Ed for one, appreciates it too. No packing, no airport security, no  cramped 12 hour flight, no hotel room, no taxis, no jetlag, no traffic. Well … scratch that last one. This is Montreal, after all, where the seasons are winter … and construction. Even in 2032, there’s plenty of traffic. (You can’t win ’em all, I guess.) “Oh well, ” thought Ed. “Decent weather today, so at least could read a book on the way in while the autodrive on the car took care of all the unpleasantness.”  And all from the comfort of the Montreal office.

Ed loves it, and his family loves it too – less time away. And besides. even though he felt a little silly to admit it, irrational as it was, Ed had felt a littled weirded out by flying ever since they started the rollout of unpiloted commerical flights in the late 2020s. Hundreds of times safer than human pilots or not, it’s still kind of creepy to have algorithms flying you around instead of people.

“Or maybe I’m just getting old, ” Ed thought. Gets a little jarring after awhile to see the world transform itself before your eyes so quickly. The young seem to take it in stride, unphased, as they always do. And, Ed had to admit that the toys are pretty cool. All this change has its benefits.

Such is the stuff of life in a world of sci-fi dreams made true.

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *